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Reading the Bible with Children April 30, 2007

Posted by David in Bible, Children, Childrens bibles, Childrens ministry, Christian, church-kids, Parenting, Sunday School, Youth ministry.
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Christopher at the TaylorWest blog, gives some insights into how he and his wife read the bible with their children:

When we read the Bible together at night with our children, we read from the ESV. Karis, Isaiah, and Gloria all follow along in their Children’s Edition of the ESV. When questions come up about the meaning of the text, I sometimes have to say, “Well, the meaning of the text isn’t that clear. I believe this is what the author meant, but others take it differently. They think it say this.”

It is tempting to interpret a verse for a child, rather than encouraging them to understand it. But they may not understand it at their age in any case, because they will need more life experience. He further explains their position:

I think this demonstration of humility before the text instils greater trust in the text than if I were to simply say, “This is what the text means.” Especially since later on as they grow in their understanding of the text, they may find that my interpretation was not at all what the text said or meant.

Found via: ESV Bible Blog


Previously: Bible versions for children

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How to praise children effectively February 14, 2007

Posted by David in Children, church-kids, Encouragement, Motivation, Parenting, Sunday School, Teaching.
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There is an excellent article on encouraging and getting the best out of children called: The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids

It basically explains that certain types of praise can be detremental.

When parents praise their children’s intelligence, they believe they are providing the solution to this problem. According to a survey conducted by Columbia University, 85 percent of American parents think it’s important to tell their kids that they’re smart. In and around the New York area, according to my own (admittedly nonscientific) poll, the number is more like 100 percent. Everyone does it, habitually. The constant praise is meant to be an angel on the shoulder, ensuring that children do not sell their talents short.

But a growing body of research—and a new study from the trenches of the New York public-school system—strongly suggests it might be the other way around. Giving kids the label of “smart” does not prevent them from underperforming. It might actually be causing it.

Go and read the article, it is long but extremely interesting.